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Prenota

Perugia

Perugia is the Umbria’s capital city in central Italy, crossed by the river Tiber and of the province of Perugia. The city is located about 164 kilometers (102 miles) north of Rome and 148 km (92 miles) south-east of Florence. It covers a high hilltop and part of the valleys around the area.

The history of Perugia goes back to the Etruscan period; Perugia was one of the main Etruscan cities.

The city is also known as the universities town, with the University of Perugia founded in 1308 (about 34,000 students), the University for Foreigners (5,000 students) and some smaller colleges such as the Academy of Fine Arts "Pietro Vannucci" (ItalianAccademia di Belle Arti "Pietro Vannucci") public athenaeum founded in 1573, the Perugia University Institute of Linguistic Mediation for translators and interpreters, the Music Conservatory of Perugia, founded in 1788, and other institutes.

Perugia is also a well-known cultural and artistic center of Italy. The city hosts multiple annual festivals and events: the Eurochocolate Festival (October), the Umbria Jazz Festival (July), and the International Journalism Festival (in April), and is associated with multiple notable people in the arts.

The famous painter Pietro Vannucci, nicknamed Perugino, was a native of Città della Pieve, near Perugia. He decorated the local Sala del Cambio (Change’s Room) with a beautiful series of frescoes; eight of his pictures can also be admired in the National Gallery of Umbria.

Perugino was the teacher of Raphael, the great Renaissance artist who produced five paintings in Perugia (today no longer in the city) and one fresco. Another famous painter, Pinturicchio, lived in Perugia. 

The city's symbol is the griffin, which can be seen in the form of plaques and statues on buildings around the city.

Churches

  • Cathedral of S. Lorenzo
  • San Pietro: late 16th-century church and abbey.
  • San Domenico: church of the Dominican order, building began in 1394 and finished in 1458. Before 1234, this site housed markets and a horse fair. The exterior design attributed to Giovanni Pisano, while its interior redecorated in Baroque fashion by Carlo Maderno. The massive belfry was partially cut around the mid-16th century. The interior hosts the splendid tomb of Pope Benedict XI and a wooden choir from the Renaissance period.
  • Sant'Angelo: also called San Michele Arcangelo: small paleo-Christian church from the 5th-6th centuries. Sixteen antique columns frame circular layout recalling the Roman church of Santo Stefano Rotondo.
  • Sant'Antonio da Padova.
  • San Bernardino: church with façade by Agostino di Duccio.
  • San Ercolano: 14th-century church that resembles a polygonal tower. This church once had two floors. Its upper floor was demolished when the Rocca Paolina was built. Baroque interior decorations commissioned from 1607. The main altar has a sarcophagus found in 1609.
  • Santa Giuliana: church and monastery founded by heir of a female monastery in 1253. In its later years, the church gained a reputation for dissoluteness. Later, the Napoleonic forces turned the church into a granary. Now, the church is a military hospital. The church, with a single nave, bears only traces of 13th century frescoes, which probably used to cover all of the walls. The cloister is a noteworthy example of mid-14th-century Cistercian architecture from Matteo Gattaponi (it). The upper part of the campanile is from the 13th-century.
  • San Bevignate: church of the Templar.

 

Secular buildings

 Antiquities

  • Ipogeo dei Volumni (Hypogeum of the Volumnus family), an Etruscan chamber tomb
  • an Etruscan Well (Pozzo Etrusco).
  • National Museum of Umbrian Archaeology, where one of the longest inscription in Etruscan is conserved, the so-called Cippus perusinus.
  • Etruscan Arch (also known as Porta Augusta), an Etruscan gate with Roman elements.